NEA Monthly News Bulletin – August-September 2017

New at the NEA


Encouraging female scientists of the future

Encouraging female scientists of the future was the focus of the international mentoring workshop held on 25‑26 July 2017 by the NEA, in co‑operation with Japan's National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST). The two‑day workshop took place in conjunction with QST's first International Symposium "Quantum Life Science" in Chiba, Japan. The primary participants in the workshop were 55 female high school students, accompanied by 16 teachers from various cities in Japan. The event provided the students with a rare opportunity to interact with seven highly accomplished female mentors to talk about their future careers in science and engineering. During the two-day workshop, the mentors exchanged their real-life experiences and shared valuable advice and insight with the students. Discussions addressed the difficulties faced by women professionals in many parts of the world and the steps that can be taken to support young women who aspire to become science and technology professionals. Read more

Women who helped shape the history of nuclear science and technology, NEA News 35.1Women who helped shape the history of nuclear science and technology

A little over a year ago, the NEA moved to a new building operated by the OECD in Boulogne‑Billancourt, located in the southern suburbs of Paris. The Boulogne building was built in 1927, originally as an industrial space long used to produce telephone control units, and had recently undergone renovations to transform the interior to an office space. Because the offices were both new and undecorated, the opportunity presented itself to be creative with the new NEA meeting rooms. NEA Director-General Mr William D. Magwood, IV, was thus inspired to give a personality to the seven meeting rooms and so initiated a staff survey to choose names for the rooms. The results of the survey ranged from elements of the periodic table to nuclear reactor components or to Star Trek characters, but the final decision was made to name the rooms after notable female scientists who had advanced knowledge in the nuclear field. Seven remarkable women, with exceptional careers but who have rarely been cast into the limelight, now grace the walls of NEA meeting rooms. Find out more in the latest issue of NEA News: oe.cd/NEA-35-1.


International Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Power in the 21st CenturyInternational Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Power in the 21st Century

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) will organise the International Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Power in the 21st Century, in co‑operation with the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, from 30 October to 1 November 2017. The event will be hosted by the Government of the United Arab Emirates through the Ministry of Energy and Federal Authority for Nuclear Regulation. The conference aims to generate high‑level dialogue on the role of nuclear power in meeting future energy demand, contributing to sustainable development and mitigating climate change. For more information, please visit the event website.



New publications

National Inventories and Management Strategies for Spent Nuclear Fuel and Radioactive Waste: Extended Methodology for the Common Presentation of Data

National Inventories and
Management Strategies for Spent
Nuclear Fuel and Radioactive Waste


NEA No. 7371

Read the report

Sourcebook of International Activities Related to the Development of Safety Cases for Deep Geological Repositories

Sourcebook of International
Activities Related to the
Development of Safety Cases
for Deep Geological Repositories

NEA No. 7341

Read the report

Recycling and Reuse of Materials Arising from the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

Recycling and Reuse
of Materials Arising
from the Decommissioning
of Nuclear Facilities

NEA No. 7310

Read the report




Nuclear safety

Advanced research activities contributing to Fukushima Daiichi decommissioning

NEA Preparatory Studies on Fuel Debris Analysis (PreADES) Project preliminary meeting, 5-11 July 2017

On 5‑7 July 2017, a preliminary meeting for the NEA Preparatory Studies on Fuel Debris Analysis (PreADES) Project was held in Tomioka, Fukushima, Japan. The PreADES Project was proposed by the Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA) of Japan and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) as a follow-up project of the NEA Senior Expert Group on Safety Research Opportunities Post‑Fukushima (SAREF), reflecting the recommendations in the SAREF report issued in February 2017. Participants discussed the draft programmes for the proposed research projects focusing on fuel debris characterisation, as well as on a future R&D framework for fuel debris analysis. Based on the suggestions and comments made at the meeting, the project proposals will be revised and prepared for the next steps.

NEA Benchmark Study of the Accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (BSAF) Project joint session with PreADES, 10-11 July 2017On 10-14 July 2017, the NEA Benchmark Study of the Accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (BSAF) Project organised its Programme Review Group meeting and a two-day a joint session with the PreADES Project meeting participants. Currently in its second phase, the project is aimed at improving severe accident codes, analysing the accident progression and the current status of units 1 and 3 of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, and providing useful information for the decommissioning strategy planning of these units. The objective of the joint session was to discuss updates on the decommissioning operations at the Fukushima Daiichi site, as well as estimation and evaluation of fuel debris property and distribution. Representatives from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, the Nuclear Damage Compensation and Decommissioning Facilitation Corporation (NDF), JAEA and Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings, Inc. (TEPCO) gave presentations on the integrated evaluation of fuel debris and fission products remaining inside the primary containment vessel of each of the three units. The session also featured interactive discussions on ongoing BSAF work on computer-code analysis.

NEA support to Fukushima Daiichi decommissioning strategy planning, NEA News 35.1NEA support to Fukushima Daiichi decommissioning strategy planning

Six years after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, the Japanese government and TEPCO are shifting their focus to strategy planning for long-term challenges related to the decommissioning of the damaged reactors. The international community has been helping to address the unprecedented challenges of managing the accident facilities. The NEA is playing a key supporting and co-ordinating role in the international community, in particular in the area of radioactive waste management and the evaluation of the conditions and location of fuel debris. An article in the latest issue of NEA News highlights ongoing international joint activities within the NEA framework, corresponding to the challenges that have been identified in the Fukushima Daiichi decommissioning strategy planning. Read the article here: oe.cd/NEA-35-1.



Nuclear development

Advanced reactors and future energy market needsAdvanced reactors and future energy market needs

Based on the results of a very well-attended international workshop on "Advanced Reactor Systems and Future Energy Market Needs" that took place in April 2017, the NEA has embarked on a two-year study with the objective of analysing evolving energy market needs and requirements, as well as examining how well reactor technologies under development today will fit into tomorrow’s low-carbon world. The NEA Expert Group on Advanced Reactor Systems and Future Energy Market Needs (ARFEM) held its first meeting on 5-6 July 2017 with experts from Canada, France, Italy, Japan, Korea, Poland, Romania, Russia and the United Kingdom. The outcome of the study will provide much needed insight into how well nuclear can fulfil its role as a key low-carbon technology, and help identify challenges related to new operational, regulatory or market requirements. Read more about advanced reactors and future energy market needs in the latest issue of NEA News: oe.cd/NEA-35-1

The future of medical isotope supply, NEA News 35.1The future of medical isotope supply

In April 2014, the NEA analysed likely future market demand and projected production capacity for 99Mo. This research identified a period beyond 2016 of increased risk when further supply disruption could result from a number of ageing supply chain participants ending their activities. The analysis also examined the likely deployment of potential new capacity and confirmed that the introduction of new capacity would be vital to ensure security of supply. Concerns were expressed at the time about the possibility of potential new facilities experiencing project delays. The overall conclusion was that 2017 would represent the start of a period of particular risk, with a likely nadir in production capacity as a result of planned facility closures and project delays. In 2017, the NEA is pleased to report that market participants have reacted positively to the concerns identified in 2014. Find out more in the NEA News article on the future of medical isotope supply at oe.cd/NEA-35-1



International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation (IFNEC)

Argentina to chair the IFNEC Steering Group

After serving as Chair of the IFNEC Steering Group since the inception of IFNEC in June 2010, United States Department of Energy Acting Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Edward McGinnis formally passed the baton to Julián Gadano, Argentina's Undersecretary for Nuclear Energy, during the Steering Group meeting hosted by the IFNEC Technical Secretariat on 29 June 2017 in Paris, France. The Steering Group members expressed their full support for Argentina assuming the position of Chair under Mr Gadano's leadership and also acknowledged the United States' contribution and Mr McGinnis' meritorious service to IFNEC. During the same week, the Infrastructure Development Working Group (IDWG) held a meeting that covered several topics including small modular reactors. The Reliable Nuclear Fuel Services Working Group (RNFSWG) also met to discuss further development of the group’s work on the dual track approach and multinational repositories. Finally, the newly formed Nuclear Supplier and Customer Countries Engagement Group met for the first time and discussed global and localised supply chain issues.


Decommissioning and legacy management

NEA Director-General William D. Magwood, IV, speaks at the International Workshop on Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Plants, June 2017Decommissioning of nuclear facilities: the work ahead and how to succeed

On 30 June 2017, NEA Director-General William D. Magwood, IV, delivered a keynote speech at the International Workshop on Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Plants, which took place in Tokyo, Japan, with more than 400 participants including international and Japanese experts, representatives from the Government of Japan and students in the area of decommissioning and radioactive waste management. The workshop aimed to inform Japanese utilities and competent authorities about worldwide efforts in the optimisation of decommissioning, to share experiences and knowledge, and to discuss solutions for different challenges in each country. During his speech, Mr Magwood addressed the latest status of international experiences in decommissioning of nuclear facilities and highlighted key elements for successful decommissioning and considerations for the future.

New report: Recycling and Reuse of Materials Arising from the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

Large quantities of materials arising from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities are non-radioactive. An additional, significant share of materials is of very low-level or low-level radioactivity and can, after having undergone treatment and a clearance process, be recycled and reused in a restricted or unrestricted way. Recycle and reuse options today provide valuable solutions to minimise radioactive waste from decommissioning and at the same time maximise the recovery of valuable materials. The NEA Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning (CPD) prepared this overview on the various approaches being undertaken by international and national organisations for the management of slightly contaminated material resulting from activities in the nuclear sector. The report draws on CPD member organisations’ experiences and practices related to recycling and reuse, which were gathered through an international survey. It provides information on improvements and changes in technologies, methodologies and regulations since the 1996 report on this subject, with the conclusions and recommendations taking into account 20 years of additional experience that will be useful for current and future practitioners. Case studies are provided to illustrate significant points of interest, for example in relation to scrap metals, concrete and soil.

Recycling and Reuse of Materials Arising from the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

Sourcebook of International Activities Related to the Development of Safety Cases for Deep Geological RepositoriesNew publication: Sourcebook of International Activities Related to the Development of Safety Cases for Deep Geological Repositories

All national radioactive waste management authorities recognise today that a robust safety case is essential in developing disposal facilities for radioactive waste. To improve the robustness of the safety case for the development of a deep geological repository, a wide variety of activities have been carried out by national programmes and international organisations over the past years. The NEA, since first introducing the modern concept of the "safety case", has continued to monitor major developments in safety case activities at the international level. This sourcebook summarises the activities being undertaken by the NEA, the European Commission (EC) and the IAEA concerning the safety case for the operational and post-closure phases of geological repositories for radioactive waste that ranges from low-level to high‑level waste and for spent fuel. In doing so, it highlights important differences in focus among the three organisations.

Legacy management: An old challenge with a new focus, NEA News 35.1Legacy management: An old challenge with a new focus

The NEA Expert Group on Legacy Management (EGLM) aims to promote a practical and optimised approach for the regulatory supervision of nuclear legacy sites and installations. NEA member countries share their experiences and approaches on legacy management and have submitted case studies to the EGLM that illustrate the common challenges and approaches of many countries. The first report of the expert group will be based on these case studies and will be released in late 2017. A new, broader focus on decommissioning and legacy management issues within the NEA is expected to take shape in early 2018, carrying forward the mission to develop and promote a practical and optimised approach for the regulatory supervision of nuclear legacy sites and installations. Read more about legacy management in the latest issue of NEA News: oe.cd/NEA-35-1



Nuclear law

NEA Director-General William D. Magwood, IV, speaks at the International Workshop on Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Plants, June 2017NEA International School of Nuclear Law wraps up another successful session

The 17th session of the NEA International School of Nuclear Law (ISNL) was held from 21 August to 1 September 2017 in Montpellier, France, bringing together a diverse group of graduate students and professionals from across the world to learn more about the legal framework and major issues affecting the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Organised by the NEA and the University of Montpellier, the ISNL is a unique educational programme that offers participants from the academic, private and governmental sectors an in-depth look at international nuclear law, focusing on areas such as nuclear safety, environmental law, security, safeguards and nuclear liability. This year's session was attended by 64 participants from 40 countries, including numerous non‑NEA member countries, many of whom received support to attend the ISNL from the IAEA, which also provided several lecturers. The ISNL has attracted since 2001 nearly 900 participants worldwide from an increasingly diverse range of countries, many of whom are now experts in the nuclear law field.


Nuclear science and data

Computer program services

Training courses

30-AUG-17 PSR-0550 ALICE2017, Statistical Model Code System to Calculate Particle Spectra from HMS Precompound Nucleus Decay
(Arrived)
30-AUG-17 PSR-0158 SAMMY 8.1.0, Multilevel R-Matrix Fits to Neutron and Charged-Particle Cross-Section Data Using Bayes' Equations
(Arrived)
18-AUG-17 NEA-1899 GRUCON-D-2017-01, Data Processing for Evaluated Working libraries (transport and shielding)
(Arrived)
11-AUG-17 USCD1242 NucWiz, set up and run Monte Carlo calculations
(Arrived)
31-JUL-17 CCC-0834 SCALE 6.2.2, A Comprehensive Modeling and Simulation Suite for Nuclear Safety Analysis and Design
(Arrived)

An online archive of previous editions is available here.

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